lebua Bangkok

100 Stories: “Poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.”

“Poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.” … But not chefs: “I love cheese so much I couldn’t tell you which one is my favourite. But my last meal would be a platter of French cheese… served with French bread and a lovely bottle of wine. Burgundy or Cotes du Rhone…”

“Poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.”
… But not chefs:
“I love cheese so much I couldn’t tell you which one is my favourite.
But my last meal would be a platter of French cheese… served with French bread and a lovely bottle of wine. Burgundy or Cotes du Rhone…”
We offer a quality selection made by Chef Vincent for Chef’s Table.

lebua Cheese

“Our cheeses are from a master cheese maker in France who matures his cheeses in his own cellar. We then customise the selection based on exactly what is required… When you are delivering overseas it's important to factor in the travel, the delivery and the habits of customers.”
These are some of Chef Vincent’s delicious choices

Tamié Abbey Cheese

Instantly recognizable, Tamié is always wrapped in a white paper decorated with the blue cross of Malta. First made in the 12 century at the Trappist Abbey of Tamié.
Tamié is a washed rind cheese with a meltingly soft centre. It is wrapped in an orange-red rind that is dusted with mould. The rind has pungent and perfumed aroma. Flavours of the cheese are delicate and balanced with sweet notes of fresh cream, salt and hay with a slightly bitter finish. Tamie is often compared to Reblochon but is larger, stronger and more perfumed.

Tomme de Chartreuse

The traditional method of heating in a copper pan enhances the flavours of milk from cattle that graze on floral pastures in the Chartreuse Valley. Washed in brine, the aromas of the cheese are earthy with lovely depths of fruit and nut and a late summer ‘bosky’ flavour.

Comté Grande Garde-2016

Made from milk from cows that eat prairie rich grass. Comté is known for its distinct ‘terroir.’ A terrior is often used when talking about wine and refers to a particular smell and taste from the surrounding area as well as traditional production methods.
There are more than 160 village-based fruitières (cheese-making facilities) so no two wheels of Comté taste alike as all the farmers bring milk from their own cows. Because of its unique character, Comté cheeses go through a "jury terroir," where trained volunteers from Comté and the region discuss the taste.

Roquefort-Le Vieux Berger by Combes family

Roquefort is known in France as the king of cheese. Only cheeses aged in the natural Combalou caves can be called Roquefort. Moist air enters through holes called "fleurines" which promotes penicillium roqueforti, making the blue vein. The cheese is white, tangy, crumbly and slightly moist, with distinctive veins of blue mould, which give a sharp tang. It has no rind and the exterior is edible and slightly salty.